How to Clean a Genuine Leather Coat

Know that many stains on leather coats can be treated with simple soap and water. This works best if your coat is considered “finished” leather, which includes most leather coats sold by retail stores.

In addition, it is best to avoid products like mink oil, shoe polish, and waxes when cleaning leather coats, as they can leave both a residue on the coat and an odor that you will not be able to get rid of after you have used the product.

Some high end dry cleaners also offer custom leather cleaning. It is important to consult with your dry cleaner about what you expect from a leather cleaning, and whether or not the cleaner will guarantee his work. Because leather is often difficult to clean, many professioal cleaners will not guarantee that all spots or stains will be removed from your leather coat, so it is best to discuss expectations before you give your garment to a professional.

Rub the damp cloth on the leather without putting too much water or pressure on your leather coat. Next, polish the leather with a dry towel, and treat the newly clean leather with a leather coat conditioner after it has air dried completely. One tip to remember when cleaning your leather coat with this method is to always test the cleaning method on a small, hidden patch of leather before proceeding to the whole item, as leather cleaning can sometimes change the color or appearance of your coat.

Genuine leather coats are a popular outwear option, they are often a garment that causes a great deal of confusion for their owner. Leather coats are functional, stylish, and always a classic choice, but they aren’t the easiest item in your wardrobe to care for or clean.

These questions often plague the leather coat owner who happens to wear their coat in bad weather, for many seasons, or to a party with a clumsy guest who spills red wine on your coat. There are ways to clean leather, but knowing a few basics about your leather coat helps make sure you don’t do more harm than good when you try to clean a spot or stain on your coat.

For unfinished leather, saddle soap worked into the leather with a damp cloth or sponge works well to clean stains and spots. Wipe away any lather and allow the leather to air dry. Oil leather with a leather preservative after you have finished cleaning and the leather is completely dry.

Determining if Your Leather Coat Was Made in the USA

The distinction between domestically produced and imported products, including leather coats, is growing foggier by the year. It is becoming hard to determine what is truly made in the United States, especially for leather products.

Trade regulations are vague as to what is considered made in the United States versus foreign made leather coats. Many consumers are unaware that a variety of leather coats are partially manufactured offshore and then finished on U.S. soil so that a Made in the USA label can be legally affixed to the garment.

Sometimes leather is tanned and processed in a foreign country and shipped to the U.S. where only a zipper, snaps, or a lining is later affixed to the leather coat. In addition, sometimes labels are switched to indicate that a leather coat is made in America but it is really produced offshore.

Again, this crime is very hard to prove and consumers are often none the wiser to the switch in the quality of their leather coat. Unless you know leather well, a pig napa leather can seem very similar to lambskin, though it is not nearly as valuable. Be aware that you may not be able to get a leather coat that is made in the United States exclusively, as most leather coats have at least some parts made in foreign countries.

Many times, when it comes to leather goods, including high end leather coats, customers get what they pay for. If a leather coat seems too cheap, it probably has a problem, and may not be the quality that the vendor is claiming that it is. It is especially important to be vigilant when buying leather coats online, which are easier to pass off as high quality because the consumer is not able to feel or smell the leather coat until it arrives, after payment has been made and the consumer has little recourse.