Determining if Your Leather Coat Was Made in the USA

The distinction between domestically produced and imported products, including leather coats, is growing foggier by the year. It is becoming hard to determine what is truly made in the United States, especially for leather products.

Trade regulations are vague as to what is considered made in the United States versus foreign made leather coats. Many consumers are unaware that a variety of leather coats are partially manufactured offshore and then finished on U.S. soil so that a Made in the USA label can be legally affixed to the garment.

Sometimes leather is tanned and processed in a foreign country and shipped to the U.S. where only a zipper, snaps, or a lining is later affixed to the leather coat. In addition, sometimes labels are switched to indicate that a leather coat is made in America but it is really produced offshore.

Again, this crime is very hard to prove and consumers are often none the wiser to the switch in the quality of their leather coat. Unless you know leather well, a pig napa leather can seem very similar to lambskin, though it is not nearly as valuable. Be aware that you may not be able to get a leather coat that is made in the United States exclusively, as most leather coats have at least some parts made in foreign countries.

Many times, when it comes to leather goods, including high end leather coats, customers get what they pay for. If a leather coat seems too cheap, it probably has a problem, and may not be the quality that the vendor is claiming that it is. It is especially important to be vigilant when buying leather coats online, which are easier to pass off as high quality because the consumer is not able to feel or smell the leather coat until it arrives, after payment has been made and the consumer has little recourse.